Inside the Locket

"The eye that blinks, that is something." -Chaim Potok

slayboybunny:

look at how beautiful my girlfriend the sky is today

(via theoneyoudontsee)

cephalopodvictorious:

roarkshop:

natvarmac:

datunofficialdisneyprincess:

theassofremylebeau:

Best lesson from a Disney movie

This is an underrated movie

This is a grossly underrated movie.

Can I take a minute to rant? Good. Cuz I’m gonna.

I FLOVE this movie. And I HATE all the stupid hatred it gets. For a long time the buzz was “finally a black princess yay!” and now everyone is like “Fuck this movie, first black princess and she spends the whole movie a frog.”

You know what? Fuck that. Because Ariel spent a good majority of the movie not talking. Mulan spent the majority of the move pretending to be a man. Aurora and Snow White? Asleep (Hardly in the movie at all). They’re all just plot devices, not designed to take away from the traits of the women. 

And you know what else? Unlike some of the other princesses, Tiana is in control of her destiny every step of the way. When she turns into the frog does she lose hope and need rescuing? Hell naw. She busts Naveen over the head and gets the job done. She is consistently responsible and capable even after having her dreams crushed and turning into a freaking frog. 

So don’t tell me that Tiana is “less than” just because she gets turned into a frog. She’s still one of the most hardworking, badass, and capable chicks in animated history and I love her like crazy cakes. 

the end. 

Also? She’s based on a real person. A real woman who is 91 and is still cooking in her kitchen. She’s still widely respected in the culinary community, she’s fed presidents, she’s had songs written about her and her restaurants. She’s 91, and she still wakes up every morning to run things, because she still believes in hard work and good food. And if you don’t think that’s truly fantastic, then you can just fuck right off.

(via kurtofskyforlife)

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hey if you’ve sent me a message or tagged me in something I haven’t forgotten or anything I’m just not on long enough right now to answer and I’m sorry! <3 love you though!

faineemae:

eggplantlit:

carnivaloftherandom:

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.

  • Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
  • While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
  • She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
  • In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
  • She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
  • Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

Her entire life, and her mother’s life as well, are FASCINATING. A Royal, Muslim, Anglo-Indian woman in WWII… Could we have a sweeping FACTUAL movie please. Like now?

Yet another story I would like to read.

You guys! There IS A MOVIE!

Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nM12xbAUM

(via fandom-friendly)

wild-guy:

Courage the Cowardly Dog: Last of the Starmakers

(via psykoaktivefantasi)

xekstrin:

wasdplz:

screaming-fan-girl:

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

The <title> of this page is “Do Consumers Want More Women In Video Games?” The results of this survey will be presented at GDC15, so let’s tell ‘em a resounding “FUCK YEAH!”

Please reblog! 

DO IT

DO THE THING

fucking tumblr bomb this shit

(via tarteauxfraises)

sweet-mayhem-song:

howdocreative:

coolerthanapinkllama:

loveetatum:

harryashe:

never thought about that when microwaving pizza. i guess it would work for other foods too

This is life changing.

Actually, don’t do the last one with the vacuum, vacuums can create an electric shock that will fry the electronic piece of equipment that you are trying to clean, instead, just use pressurized air in a can. The more you know…

Except plastic isn’t a good conductor and wouldn’t apply if you do it with the cap on and doesn’t always apply anyway

These comments are so confusing when you haven’t read the post

(via postulation)

l0uderthanb0mbs:

CRUSH // a playlist for teens with crushes
listen here

l0uderthanb0mbs:

CRUSH // a playlist for teens with crushes

listen here

(via ghostiegrrrl)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

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Prose B4 Hoes.
Ernest Hemingway in a letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald, probably. (via seeyou-invancouver)

(via youcantstopthesignalmal)

iaminkwellj:

ultrafacts:

Source: 1 2 3 4 5 6 If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

Important.

(via bootybasket)

infamousnfamous:

outrageouslyqueer:

who the fuck hears ‘id like this character to be more visibly queer’ and interprets it as ‘id like this character to be a flamboyant stereotype’

straight people

(via monobored)

lamardeuse:

WHY DOES THIS NOT HAVE 1,000,000 NOTES.

(via queerkybarnes)